Search

Search

    ES200D
    ES400A
    ES400B
    ES600
    ES200D
    ES400A
    ES400B
    ES600
    EB100
    EB200
    Data Services
    Charging Cabinet
    BEETLE
    NEON
    ES50
    ES200
    ES500
    BEETLE
    NEON
    ES50
    ES200
    ES500
    EB10

    Okai News - June 2021

    News from Okai

    As life and business slowly get back to normal, we want to take time to say THANK YOU to all our incredible partners for their continuous trust in our products.

    Even in these hard times, we saw unprecedented demand for micromobility vehicles. We look forward to continuing our work with you, driving toward a sustainable future for urban mobility.

    While we have you, a few brief updates:
    • We’re excited to announce that our famous ES500 e-scooter is now available to U.S. consumers. Get yours here while supplies lasts.
    • We’re planning on releasing our ES400 sharing model with various battery cell options to decrease price and lead times. Get in touch with your account manager to find out more if you’re interested.
    • We just updated our unsplash profile. Check it out if you need fresh content for your website, social media, or anything else. 
    • Lastly, as the on-demand food/grocery sector continues to heat up, don’t forget that our upgraded EB100C is ready to handle all your delivery needs!

    Latest Reports

    1. It’s official. Tier, Dott, and Lime have scored permits to participate in London’s long-awaited e-scooter pilot, starting this month.
    2. Spin is going through a shakeup. The e-scooter startup recently announced a new CEO (former CBO Ben Bear), a new form factor (e-bikes), and a new strategy (doubling down on smaller, more profitable cities). The news comes amid rumors that Spin’s parent company, Ford, is considering divesting to focus on autonomous and electric cars. 
    3. Tier has raised $60M in debt from Goldman Sachs to fund expansion of its micromobility fleet and charging network. 
    4. Pedal bike makers warn that global shortages could stretch into 2022.
    5. Within 24 hours earlier this month, two quick commerce startups, Flink and Getir, announced a combined total of nearly $800M in new funding for 10-min grocery delivery.
    6. Shortly after announcing plans to invest in a massive battery-swapping network in India, Taiwanese e-moped startup Gogoro revealed it is entering the Chinese market as well. 
    7. On the long list of must-have pandemic purchases, electric bikes must’ve ranked alongside puppies and Pelotons. Across eight European countries—Germany, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, Spain, Italy, and the Czech Republic—e-bike sales went up by an average of 36% in 2020.
    8. New York City saved an estimated 100K jobs during the health crisis by allowing restaurants to convert a mere 8,550 parking spots into outdoor dining areas. Now picture the economic impact the city could achieve if it rezoned the rest of its 3M parking spaces...

    What We're Reading


    It’s not just your imagination, cars really are getting bigger—and more dangerous. Streetsblog investigates America’s “megacar” crisis, or the growing flood of multi-ton SUVs, vans, trucks, and other supersized vehicles on the road, and the unique hazards they pose to pedestrians. “Today, megacars account for a staggering 75.9 percent of new car sales—a number that’s up from 53 percent just eight years ago, and that experts expect to grow, despite the fact that people on foot are up to three times more likely to be killed when struck by the drivers of such vehicles.”


    In the 1950s and 1960s, the emergence of freeways radically reshaped countless cities, when walkable downtown neighborhoods were bulldozed to make way for more cars. The New York Times is out with an interactive feature that reveals how the post-war highway boom carved up many urban communities and examines whether highway removal projects could heal these scars and improve life for residents. 

    In the wake of Covid-19, city leaders all over the world are wondering how to revive sagging transit ridership and help struggling low-income residents. One novel solution being embraced by some communities is to simply make transit free for everyone to ride. Scrapping fares certainly sounds like a great idea. (After all, who doesn’t like free stuff?) But as Slate points out, it could have unintended consequences for bus and train networks down the line. Without fare revenue to rely on, public transit operators might be forced to slash service, leaving riders stranded. 


    Wired looks at how Oakland reinvented urban planning to tackle the pandemic. Like many communities, the Californian city acted swiftly to restrict car use in the early days of the crisis, opening up streets so people could exercise, socialize, and dine outdoors. But to the surprise of Oakland’s leaders, the public’s initial response was not positive, especially in less affluent neighborhoods. In response, transportation officials embarked on a listening tour, soliciting extensive feedback from residents on how the slow streets pilot could be improved. Based on their input, Oakland then pivoted from a strategy that centered on road closures, to one that focused more broadly on livability and safety. Said one local transit advocate: “It’d be nice if the public sector was allowed to try and fail the way that tech companies do. I think the taxpayer would get a lot more out of it.”


    Wondering why everything from bicycles to lumber is in such short supply these days? The New York Times delves into “Just in Time” manufacturing, the global business practice of delivering parts to factories no sooner than they are needed, and how it led to acute shortages of many goods in the last year. “From fashion to food processing to pharmaceuticals, companies have embraced Just In Time to stay nimble, allowing them to adapt to changing market demands, while cutting costs. But the tumultuous events of the past year have challenged the merits of paring inventories, while reinvigorating concerns that some industries have gone too far, leaving them vulnerable to disruption.”

    Words of the Month

    German:Fernweh
    Literally translated as “far sickness,” or longing for far-off places

    Chinese:xiāng 香
    In most cases, xiāng means “fragrant.” However, when applied to food, it refers to something that can’t quite be described in English. Something that is xiāng has an intense, often meaty aroma that gets your mouth watering.
    Okai News - September 2021
    Okai News - September 2021 News from Okai First and foremost, we want to say thank you to everyone who...
    Recap of Eurobike 2021
    Recap of Eurobike 2021 A Successful Show! Dear friends and family of Okai,  We spent this past week at the...
    Okai News - August 2021
    Okai News - August 2021 News from Okai Next month is going to be exciting.If you want to be the...
    Okai News - September 2021
    Okai News - September 2021 News from Okai First and foremost, we want to say thank you to everyone who...
    Recap of Eurobike 2021
    Recap of Eurobike 2021 A Successful Show! Dear friends and family of Okai,  We spent this past week at the...